Expert Galleries: Audrée Lapierre

Expert Galleries: Audrée Lapierre

Audrée Lapierre is a creative director at FFunction — the data visualization studio behind the projects Women in Science, GOOD Spots, The Honeybees Extinction and more — and along with FFunction CEO Sébastien Pierre spoke at this year's Visualized conference. Lapierre is the latest curator for our Expert Galleries series, selecting projects that demonstrate Interesting UI


How and why did you choose the focus of the gallery?

One of the biggest challenge I have at FFunction is designing data visualization interfaces for broad audiences. Visual complexity can be overwhelming for the data visualization novice and interaction can add to the confusion. Because data visualizations are often custom-made for a specific data set or purpose, there doesn’t seem to be a one-size fits all solution to UI design. I’m often mentally juggling with this issue and this is the reason why I chose to make it the focus of my gallery.

What is your favorite piece in the gallery and why?

I was not especially looking at the quality of the visualizations in this gallery, but I was mostly interested in finding projects that featured creative UI design. I liked how simple it was to compare countries without losing sight of the big picture in The Web Index 2013 by Ruslan Kamolov. I also liked how clever it was to group and label the filters by what they reveal in Classroom Seating Habits by Ali Almossawi. It adds an element of narration and prevents the user from having to click blindly.

What is one insight you'd like viewers to take away from the gallery?

Since data visualization is relatively new, there are opportunities for creating never seen before UI patterns. Unique design challenges can give birth to solutions that can potentially make a project shine.

What is one insight you discovered in making the gallery?

Displaying a large amount of nodes/labels in a network can make it unreadable, and I saw that the visualizing community found a few UI tricks around that problem. In some instances creators used a fisheye to zoom in on a section of the visualization. Other times, they hid the graph to only show elements related to a selection, which allowed one to focus on a few points without losing context.

 

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